An experienced executive would have focussed on maximizing the resources available to deal with the spill and removing all impediments to the deployment of those resources.  The two major resources required to deal with the spill are skimmers to suck up the oil at sea, and sand berms to stop the oil hitting the shore-line.

Obama failed completely in his executive duty. Paul Rubin, in a WSJ Op Ed, writes:

Various skimmers and tankers (some of them very large) are available that could eliminate most of the oil from seawater, discharging the mostly clean water while storing the oil onboard. While this would clean vast amounts of water efficiently, the EPA is unwilling to grant a temporary waiver of its regulations.

Next, the Obama administration can waive the Jones Act, which restricts foreign ships from operating in U.S. coastal waters. Many foreign countries (such as the Netherlands and Belgium) have ships and technologies that would greatly advance the cleanup. So far, the U.S. has refused to waive the restrictions of this law and allow these ships to participate in the effort.

The combination of these two regulations is delaying and may even prevent the world’s largest skimmer, the Taiwanese owned “A Whale,” from deploying. This 10-story high ship can remove almost as much oil in a day as has been removed in total—roughly 500,000 barrels of oily water per day. The tanker is steaming towards the Gulf, hoping it will receive Coast Guard and EPA approval before it arrives.

Gateway Pundit has more on the Obama administration’s utter failure to act competently and decisively, let alone honestly.

Flopping Aces cites a 16 page report by House member Darrell Issa (R-CA) that is highly critical of the administration. A disturbing highlight:

These bureaucratic breakdowns have forced at least one Parish to take matters
into its own hands. One Jefferson official, who said that “the only thing [Coast Guard
and BP] understand is threats and embarrassment,” commandeered over fifty vessels
sitting idle at docks while oil slicks approached shore. He told committee staff that BP
and Coast Guard repeatedly denied his request to deploy the boats because they had no
fuel or groceries. Despite Coast Guard’s threat of military force, he exercised his
emergency law enforcement powers to seize the equipment. Using Parish funds, he
supplied the vessels and sent them out to sea.

These bureaucratic breakdowns have forced at least one Parish to take matters into its own hands. One Jefferson official, who said that “the only thing [Coast Guard and BP] understand is threats and embarrassment,” commandeered over fifty vessels sitting idle at docks while oil slicks approached shore. He told committee staff that BP and Coast Guard repeatedly denied his request to deploy the boats because they had no fuel or groceries. Despite Coast Guard’s threat of military force, he exercised his emergency law enforcement powers to seize the equipment. Using Parish funds, he supplied the vessels and sent them out to sea.

Big Government at its finest? More like its worst, and it started at the top.

But there are some winners. US Maritime unions can rest easy that the Jones Act is still in place. The EPA’s power to screw things up with moronic regulations remains unchallenged.  The Greenies get to bash Big Oil for another generation. Great work, Mr. President.

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