Medved’s opinion piece Six Big Lies About John McCain makes the case that McCain has been unfairly cast as a RINO. On the McCain/Kenndy immigration plan, Medved writes:

No President will ever succeed in driving out all 12 million illegals – the greatest forced migration in all human history. Illegals represent more than 5% of America’s work force and the cost of firing and, ultimately, deporting for forcing out every one of those people would cripple the economy far worse than any recession. The immigration bills McCain supported (along with President Bush and the Senate Republican leadership of Mitch McConnell, Trent Lott and John Kyl) never granted “amnesty” or automatic citizenship for undocumented aliens. Instead, McCain’s idea of immigration reform always emphasized “earned legalization” and assimilation– not automatic privileges – in an effort to separate the immigrants who wanted to begin playing by the rules and to enter the American mainstream, from those who continued to defy those rules and have no long-term stake in the country. It’s not amnesty to charge $6,000 in fines and payment of back taxes, to require background checks and mastery of English, and to demand registry with the government and acknowledgment of wrong-doing before an immigrant received legal status. Before an illegal could become a citizen, the process required at least nine years (and in most cases fourteen) of cooperation, commitment and patience. Moreover, two crucial elements of last year’s immigration bill received almost no attention: under the bill any immigrant who attempted to enter America illegally after the passage of immigration reform would be apprehended, identified, finger-printed and biometrically recorded, and forever banned from receiving legal status to work or live in the United States. Second, the unfinished (and ultimately unsuccessful) compromise bill included a “trigger provision”: no illegal immigrant would receive legal status until after Congress certified that the border had been effectively secured.

The 12 million illegals apparently succeeded in coming here, most of them since the Reagan amnesty. In Medved’s terms, that represents one of the greatest migrations in human history. So, what is so hard about them making the return journey? We’re already seeing that the rigorous enforcement of the law in Arizona has resulted in illegals returning to Mexico. They can, and will, self-deport. All they need is the incentive to do so. No free health care, no free schooling and no jobs will see to that. Rather than encourage the illegals to leave, McCain gave them an incentive to stay:”It’s not amnesty to charge $6,000 in fines and payment of back taxes, to require background checks and mastery of English, and to demand registry with the government and acknowledgment of wrong-doing before an immigrant received legal status. Before an illegal could become a citizen, the process required at least nine years (and in most cases fourteen) of cooperation, commitment and patience. ” So, we let them stay in the US for nine years, paying, maybe $12,000 total, and then grant them citizenship. That is a form of amnesty and a slap in the face for the millions of better qualified legal immigrants who are patiently waiting for their green cards.

The economic argument is bogus. The illegals pay few taxes, displace legal residents from paying jobs, consume tax-payer funded health care and education, and remit billions of dollars back to Mexico. It’s a good deal for Mexico, which has been exporting its poverty problem to the US.

Maybe McCain will win the GOP nomination. Since the alternatives are worse, GOP supporters are going to have to support him and hope he stops doing dirty deals with Democrats. but the signs on that score are not good. Mark Holzer in Frontpage Magazine documents McCain supporting Kerry against the Swift Boat Veterans:

The authors write concerning the press conference for the anti-Kerry film, Stolen Honor, one POW arrived late for the press conference, Col. George ‘Bud’ Day. Day was a legendary military figure, a veteran of WWII, Korea and Vietnam who had been awarded the Medal of Honor for his incredible 12-day effort to escape from his captors after his F-100F Misty FAC was shot down over North Vietnam in August 1967. Senator John McCain, his former cellmate in Vietnam, had called Day ‘one of the greatest men I have had the honor to know.” Now, Bud Day was at McCain’s Washington office, asking his old friend to tone down his criticism of the Swift Vets. Day pointed out, as had Admiral Roy Hoffmann, that the Swifties were witnesses to what Kerry had done in Vietnam, but McCain was not.” (My emphasis.) (The source for this statement, another POW, is unimpeachable.)

Yes, the man who today would be Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces of the United States, John S. McCain, III, stood up for Fake Warrior (and Senate colleague) John Kerry against the overwhelming evidence that his atrocity stories were damaging lies, eclipsed only by his fraudulent self-created tales of heroism in Vietnam.

Were the full story of McCain’s attempt to undermine the Swifties and bolster the faker Kerry known in detail today, perhaps he would not be doing so well in some of the Republican primaries.

Maybe, in the spirit of bipartisanship, McCain would give Kerry a high profile position in his administration. It wouldn’t be surprising.

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